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News 2018-01-23T10:33:59+00:00

Imposter Syndrome

Michelle Obama has recently acknowledged that she suffers from Imposter Syndrome which is a feeling of not really deserving to be where you are and that someone will find out that you are not as good/smart/useful as they think you are.

For 10 ways to deal with imposter syndrome see www.shriverreport.org/10-ways-to-overcome-impostor.

By | December 5th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Increase well being with thank you notes.

Thank you notes increase well being.

New research from the University of Austin, Texas, confirms that mums everywhere were right about the importance of writing thank you notes to friends and family.

In a study that discovered wellbeing benefits for both the writer and the recipients, researchers asked participants to write a gratitude letter to someone who had done something nice for them, and then anticipate their reaction. In each case, the writers overestimated how awkward the recipient would feel about the letter, and consistently underestimated how surprised and happy they would feel receiving it.

The researchers also found that anxiety about what to write, or that the gesture would be misinterpreted, was what caused many people to shy away from writing the notes. Despite this, the study’s authors are encouraging us to push through and reap the wellbeing benefits that come from expressing gratitude.

“What we saw is that it only takes a couple of minutes to compose letters like these – thoughtful ones and sincere ones,” says researcher Amit Kumar. “It comes at little cost, but the benefits are larger than people expect.”

So next time someone does something nice for you, let’s make our mums proud and send that thank you note.

New research from the University of Austin, Texas, confirms that mums everywhere were right about the importance of writing thank you notes to friends and family.

In a study that discovered wellbeing benefits for both the writer and the recipients, researchers asked participants to write a gratitude letter to someone who had done something nice for them, and then anticipate their reaction. In each case, the writers overestimated how awkward the recipient would feel about the letter, and consistently underestimated how surprised and happy they would feel receiving it.

The researchers also found that anxiety about what to write, or that the gesture would be misinterpreted, was what caused many people to shy away from writing the notes. Despite this, the study’s authors are encouraging us to push through and reap the wellbeing benefits that come from expressing gratitude.

“What we saw is that it only takes a couple of minutes to compose letters like these – thoughtful ones and sincere ones,” says researcher Amit Kumar. “It comes at little cost, but the benefits are larger than people expect.”

So next time someone does something nice for you, let’s make our mums proud and send that thank you note.

By | August 31st, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments